Bill Wilson

Contact information:

Research interests

William K. Wilson

Regulation of cellular processes by sterols

Dept. of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Trace analysis of sterols

Rice University MS 140

Biosynthesis and metabolism of sterols

6100 Main Street

NMR of steroids and sphingolipids

Houston, TX 77005 USA

Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome

billw@rice.edu

Conformational analysis of sterols

713-348-4914 (phone)

Reaction mechanisms

713-348-5154 (FAX)

Synthetic transformations of sterols


A research laboratory dedicated to sterols and sphingolipids

Contents

Introduction

Research topics, 1964-1999

Professor George J. Schroepfer, Jr.

Continuation of research projects after December 1998

Recent publications from the laboratory of Dr. Schroepfer

Major equipment available

Former students, postdoctoral researchers, and visiting scientists


 

Introduction

The remainder of this page is dedicated to the memory of the late Professor George J. Schroepfer, Jr., under whom I served as a postdoc for over 16 years. The material presented below is designed to serve as a source of information for collaborators, prospective postdocs, and others who may be interested in the life and work of Dr. Schroepfer. Also included is an account of current efforts to continue projects initiated by Dr. Schroepfer.


 

Research topics, 1964-1999

Biochemical and biomedical

Elucidation of pathways of sterol and sphingolipid biosynthesis and metabolism

Inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis (and their mechanism of action)

Biosynthesis of oxygenated fatty acids

Mechanism and stereochemistry of enzymatic reactions

Esterification of sterols by ACAT

Studies of membrane constituents

Hypocholesterolemic activity of oxygenated sterols

Arteriosclerosis

Effects of oxygenated sterols on rodents and primates

Protein purification

Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome

Meiosis activating sterols

Metabolism-based design of sterols of potential pharmacological importance

Oxysterols as regulators of cellular processes

 

Analytical, chromatographic, and spectroscopic

Efficient chromatographic methods for the separation of sterols, isoprenoids, and sphingolipids

Identification and quantitation of endogenous sterols and oxysterols

Structure determination of sterols by NMR, GC-MS, and X-ray crystallography,

Elucidation of mass spectral fragmentation (electron impact)

Derivatization methods for GC

Argentation chromatography

Differentiation of enantiomers and other stereoisomers by chromatographic and spectral methods

NMR signal assignments of sterols and sphingolipids

Applications of mass spectrometry to the solution of biochemical problems

Novel conformations of sterols

Isotopic fractionation of sterols

Generation of artifacts in sterol analysis

 

Synthetic and organic

Preparation of sterols and sphingolipids of biological importance

Reagents for selective organic transformations (exemplified by reactions of sterols)

Organic reaction mechanisms

Process development (applied to steroid syntheses)

Total synthesis of sphingolipid bases

Methods for isotopic labeling


 

Professor George J. Schroepfer, Jr.

George J. Schroepfer, Jr. was a prominent scientist in the fields of sterols and sphingolipids. Growing up in Minneapolis as the son of a distinguished engineering professor, Schroepfer received an excellent education that culminated in M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Minnesota. After postdoctoral stints with Sir John Cornforth and the late George Popjak at the Hammersmith Hospital in London and with Konrad Bloch at Harvard, Schroepfer returned to the University of Minnesota as an assistant professor. Immediately recruited by the Chemistry Department at the University of Illinois, Schroepfer quickly rose through the ranks to become Director of the School of Basic Medical Sciences in 1968. Shortly afterwards, he was invited to found a Biochemistry Department at Rice University.

Schroepfer was a strong and dynamic administrator as well as a highly productive research director. His primary research interests centered around the role of sterols in heart disease. However, his research projects embraced a wide range of topics, from fullerenes to sphingolipids, from kilogram-scale organic synthesis to trace-level analysis of oxysterols, and from regulation of transcription to elucidation of mass spectral fragmentation. Schroepfer adopted a multidisciplinary approach to biomedical problems. His wide range of knowledge and enthusiasm for diverse areas of research enabled him to attract a variety of scientists, including biochemists, molecular biologists, physicians, synthetic chemists, spectroscopists, and chromatographers. This diversity was a hallmark of his research and contributed to the respect and loyalty felt by the dozens of graduate students and scores of postdocs who passed through his laboratory.

Professor Schroepfer died suddenly of an apparent heart attack on December 11, 1998.

More extensive information can be found in tributes to Dr. Schroepfer. One tribute was published in the April 1999 issue of the Journal of Lipid Research (pages 774-775); another will be published in Lipids (March 2000). Dr. Schroepfer also wrote a brief autobiography, which I will be happy to provide to his close personal friends. A memorial service attended by friends and colleagues from around the world was held at Rice University on January 29, 1999. Also, an endowed memorial fund has been established at Rice University.


 

Continuation of research projects after December 1998

Since Dr. Schroepfer's death, his current grants have been administered by Professor Seiichi P.T. Matsuda, who had been selected by Dr. Schroepfer to inherit his laboratory upon his retirement (originally expected to occur in 2001). Dr. Matsuda heads a vigorous research program to elucidate the biosynthesis of terpenes using molecular biological methods. An important component of his work involves sterol biosynthesis, one of Dr. Schroepfer's strongest interests.

Because of funding uncertainties after Dr. Schroepfer's death, key members of his group departed in mid 1999 upon finding positions in industry. During this time, Dr. Schroepfer's last graduate student, Benfang Ruan, wrote and defended her Ph.D. thesis. Apart from Alemka Kisic (Biochemistry Department Administrator since 1982), only two members of Dr. Schroepfer's original laboratory remain at Rice, namely Bill Wilson and Jihai Pang. Jihai is an expert in mass spectrometry and has recently begun to carry out trace analyses of oxysterols. We are continuing to write up the large body of Dr. Schroepfer's unpublished work and are working to complete his unfinished research projects, which include (but are by no means limited to) the following:

1. studying the putative role of sterols in the activation of meiosis;

2. developing a rapid screening method for the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome;

3. investigating other genetic disorders involving defects in sterol biosynthesis;

4. studying the effects of oxygenated sterols that stimulate the differentiation of calcifying vascular cells (important in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic lesions);

5. studying the effects of oxysterols on cholesterol esterification by ACAT and LCAT;

6. applying improved methods we have developed for the quantitation of oxysterols in blood and tissues;

7. extending our studies of the actions of oxysterols on the nuclear orphan receptor LXRa;

8. exploiting the discovery that farnesoic acid is an extraordinary inducer of P-450BM-3, a drug-inducible cytochrome P-450 in Bacillus megaterium;

9. investigating the potent inhibition by isoprenoids of LXRa;

10. studying the interrelationships of sterol and sphingolipid base metabolism in mutants defective in serine palmitoyltransferase (an essential enzyme in sphingolipid base synthesis).


  

Recent publications from the laboratory of Dr. Schroepfer

Ni, Y., Kisic, A., Wilson, W. K., and Schroepfer, G. J., Jr., Inhibitors of sterol synthesis. Tritium-labeled 26-hydroxycholesterol of high specific activity from a byproduct of the Clemmensen reduction of diosgenin, J. Lipid Res. 35, 546-559 (1994)

Swaminathan, S., Siddiqui, A. U., Pinkerton, F. D., Gerst, N., Wilson, W. K., and Schroepfer, G. J., Jr., Inhibitors of sterol synthesis: 3b-Hydroxy-25,26,26,26,27,27,27-heptafluoro-5a-cholestan-15-one, an analog of a potent hypocholesterolemic agent in which its major metabolism is blocked, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 201, 168-173 (1994)

Wilson, W. K., Swaminathan, S., Pinkerton, F. D., Gerst, N., and Schroepfer, G. J., Jr., Inhibitors of sterol synthesis. Effects of fluorine substitution at carbon atom 25 of cholesterol on its spectral and chromatographic properties and on 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity in CHO-K1 cells, Steroids 59, 310-317 (1994)

Gerst, N., Pinkerton, F. D., Kisic, A., Wilson, W. K., Swaminathan, S., and Schroepfer, G. J., Jr., Inhibitors of sterol synthesis. Effects of a new fluorinated analog of 3b-hydroxy-5a-cholest-8(14)-en-15-one in rats, J. Lipid Res. 35, 1040-1056 (1994)

Izumi, A., Pinkerton, F. D., Nelson, S. O., St. Pyrek, J., Neill, P. J. G., Smith, J. H., and Schroepfer, G. J., Jr., Inhibitors of sterol synthesis. Submicromolar 14a-ethyl-5a-cholest-7-ene-3b,15a-diol causes a major modification of the sterol composition of CHO-K1 cells and a marked change in cell morphology, J. Lipid Res. 35, 1251-1266 (1994)

Siddiqui, A. U., Gerst, N., Kim, L. J., Pinkerton, F. D., Kisic, A., Wilson, W. K., and Schroepfer, G. J., Jr., Inhibitors of sterol synthesis: Effects of a 7a-alkyl analog of 3b-hydroxy-5a-cholest-8(14)-en-15-one on 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity in cultured mammalian cells and on serum cholesterol levels and other parameters in rats, Chem. Phys. Lipids 70, 163-178 (1994)

Siddiqui, A. U., Wilson, W. K., and Schroepfer, G. J., Jr., Inhibitors of sterol synthesis. An improved chemical synthesis of 26-oxygenated D8(14)-15-ketosterols having the 25R configuration, Chem. Phys. Lipids 71, 205-218 (1994)

Siddiqui, A. U., Wilson, W. K., and Schroepfer, G. J., Jr., Inhibitors of sterol synthesis. An improved synthesis of 26-oxygenated D8(14)-15-ketosterols having the 25R configuration, Erratum (correction of errors of publisher), Chem. Phys. Lipids 72, 100 (1994)

Siddiqui, A. U., Swaminathan, S., Pinkerton, F. D., Gerst, N., Wilson, W. K., Choi, H., and Schroepfer, G. J., Jr., Inhibitors of sterol synthesis: Synthesis and spectral properties of derivatives of 3b-hydroxy-25,26,26,26,27,27,27-heptafluoro-5a-cholest-8(14)-en-15-one fluorinated at carbon 7 or carbon 9 and their effects on 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity in cultured mammalian cells, Chem. Phys. Lipids 72, 59-75 (1994)

Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., Herz, J.E., Swaminathan, S., and Wilson, W.K., Side chain derivatized 15-oxygenated sterols, methods for using them and a process for preparing them, USA Patent 5,371,077 (December 6, 1994)

Siddiqui, A. U., Wilson, W. K., Parish, E. J., Gerst, N., Pinkerton, F. D., and Schroepfer, G. J., Jr., Inhibitors of sterol synthesis. Synthesis and spectral properties of 3b-hydroxy-5a-cholestan-15-one and its 14b-epimer and their effects on 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity, Chem. Phys. Lipids 74, 1-15 (1994)

Swaminathan, S., Siddiqui, A. U., Gerst, N., Pinkerton, F. D., Kisic, A., Kim, L. J., Wilson, W. K., and Schroepfer, G. J., Jr., Inhibitors of sterol synthesis. Metabolism-based design and construction of a new analog of 3b-hydroxy-5a-cholest-8(14)-en-3b-ol-15-one and its effects in cultured mammalian cells and in rats, J. Lipid Res. 36, 767-786 (1995)

Kisic, A., Tsuda, M., Kulmacz, R.J., Wilson, W.K., and Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., Sphingolipid bases. A revisitation of the O-methyl derivatives of sphingosine. Isolation and characterization of diacetate derivatives, with revised 13C nuclear magnetic resonance assignments for D-erythro-sphingosine, J. Lipid Res. 36, 787-803 (1995)

Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., Design of new oxysterols for regulation of cholesterol metabolism, Curr. Pharm. Des. 2, 103-120 (1996).

Wilson, W.K., Sumpter, R.M., Warren, J.J., Rogers, P.S., Ruan, B., and Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., Analysis of unsaturated C27 sterols by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, J. Lipid Res. 37, 1529-1555 (1996)

Ruan, B., Pang, J., Wilson, W.K., and Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., Concerning the thermolability of cholesta-5,8-dien-3b-ol, a sterol that accumulates in blood and tissues in a human genetic developmental disorder, Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett. 6, 2421-2424 (1996)

Ruan, B., Shey, J., Gerst, N., Wilson, W.K., and Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., Silver ion high pressure liquid chromatography provides unprecedented separation of sterols: Application to the enzymatic formation of cholesta-5,8-dien-3b-ol, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93, 11603-11608 (1996)

Needleman, D.H., Aghdasi, B., Seryshev, A.B., Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., and Hamilton, S.L., Modulation of skeletal muscle Ca+2 release channel activity by sphingosine, Am. J. Physiol., 272, C1465-C1474 (1997)

Siddiqui, A.U., Swaminathan, S., Su, X., Wilson, W.K., and Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., Inhibitors of sterol synthesis. Synthesis and spectral properties of 3b-hydroxy-25,26,26,26,27,27,27-heptafluoro-5a-cholestan-15-one, Chem. Phys. Lipids 86, 95-119 (1997).

Gerst, N., Ruan, B., Pang, J., Wilson, W.K., and Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., An updated look at the analysis of C27 sterols by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, J. Lipid Res. 38, 1685-1701 (1997).

Forman, B.M., Ruan, B., Chen, J., Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., and Evans, R.M., The orphan nuclear receptor LXRa is positively and negatively regulated by distinct products of mevalonate metabolism, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 94, 10588-10593 (1997)

Ruan, B., Gerst, N., Emmons, G.T., Shey, J., and Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., Sterol synthesis. A timely look at the capabilities of conventional and silver ion high performance liquid chromatography for the separation of C27 sterols related to cholesterol biosynthesis, J. Lipid Res. 38, 2615-2626 (1997)

Su, X., Siddiqui, A.U., Swaminathan, S., Wilson, W.K., and Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., Preparation of 25,26,26,26,27,27,27-heptafluoro-15-ketosterols labeled at C-23 with deuterium or tritium, J. Labelled Compounds Radiopharm. 41, 63-74 (1998)

Ruan, B., Wilson, W.K., and Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., An alternative synthesis of 4,4-dimethyl-5a-cholesta-8,14,24-trien-3b-ol, an intermediate in sterol biosynthesis and a reported activator of meiosis and of nuclear orphan receptor LXRa, Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett. 8, 233-236 (1998)

Su, X., Siddiqui, A., Swaminathan, S., Wilson, W.K., and Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., Preparation of 25,26,26,26,27,27,27-heptafluoro-15-ketosterols labeled at C-23 with deuterium or tritium, Erratum, J. Labelled Compounds Radiopharm. 41, 253-254 (1998)

Ruan, B., Watanabe, S., Eppig, J.J., Kwoh, C., Dzidic, N., Pang, J.-H., Wilson, W.K., and Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., Sterols affecting meiosis: novel chemical syntheses and the biological activity and spectral properties of the synthetic sterols, J. Lipid Res. 39, 2005-2020 (1998)

Carroll, J.N., Pinkerton, F.D., Su, X., Gerst, N., Wilson, W.K., and Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., Sterol synthesis. Synthesis of 25,26,26,26,27,27,27-heptafluorocholest-5-en-7-one and its effects on HMG-CoA reductase activity in Chinese hamster ovary cells, on ACAT activity in rat jejunal microsomes, and serum cholesterol levels in rats, Chem. Phys. Lipids 94, 209-225 (1998).

Li, S., Wilson, W.K., and Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., Chemical synthesis of D-ribo-phytosphingosine-1-phosphate, a potential modulator of cellular processes, J. Lipid Res. 40, 117-125 (1999).

Ruan, B., Wilson, W.K., and Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., An improved synthesis of (20R,22R)-cholest-5-ene-3b,20,22-triol, an intermediate in steroid hormone formation and an activator of nuclear orphan receptor LXRa,Steroids 64, 385-395 (1999).

Li, S., Wilson, W.K., and Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., New methods for determining the enantiomeric purity of erythro-sphingosine, J. Lipid Res. 40, 764-772 (1999).

Li, S., Pang, J., Wilson, W.K., and Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., Sterol synthesis. Preparation and characterization of fluorinated and deuterated analogs of oxygenated derivatives of cholesterol, Chem. Phys. Lipids 99, 33-71 (1999).

Li, S., Pang, J., Wilson, W.K., and Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., Efficient synthesis of deuterium- and tritium-labeled D-erythro-sphingosine, J. Labelled Cpd. Radiopharm., 42, 815-826 (1999).

Su, X., Wilson, W.K., and Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., Synthesis of deuterium- and tritium-labeled 25,26,26,26,27,27,27-heptafluorocholesterol, J. Labelled Cmpd. Radiopharm. 42, 509-518 (1999).

Ruan, B., Wilson, W.K., Pang, J., and Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., Synthesis of [3a-3H]cholesta-5,8-dien-3b-ol and tritium-labeled forms of other sterols of potential importance in the Smith-Lemli-Optiz syndrome, Steroids 65, 29-39 (2000).

Li, S., Pang, J., Wilson, W.K., and Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., A new approach to the stereoselective total synthesis of isotopically labeled D-ribo-phytosphingosine, Tetrahedron Asymm. 10, 1697-1707 (1999).

Sharma, C., Li, S., Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., and Needleman, D.H., Inhibition of Ca2+ release channel (ryanodine receptor) activity by sphingolipid bases: mechanism of action, Chem. Phys. Lipids 104, 1-11 (2000).

Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., Oxysterols: modulators of cholesterol metabolism and other processes, Physiol. Rev. 80, 361-554 (2000)

Li, S., Pang, J., Jackson, E.M., Wilson, W.K., Mott, G.E., and Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., Kinetics and plasma concentrations of 26-hydroxycholesterol in baboons, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1485, 173-184 (2000).

Ruan, B., Wilson, W.K., Tsai, J., and Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., Aberrant pathways in the late stages of cholesterol biosynthesis. Origin and metabolic fate of unsaturated sterols relevant to the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, J. Lipid Res. 41, 1772-1782 (2000).

Downs, S.M., Ruan, B., and Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., Meiosis-activating sterol and the maturation of isolated mouse oocytes, Biol. Reprod. 64, 80-89 (2001)

Lindenthal, B., Holleran, A.L., Aldaghlas, T.A., Ruan, B., Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., Wilson, W.K., and Kelleher, J.K., Progestins block cholesterol synthesis to produce meiosis-activating sterols, FASEB J. 15, 775-784 (2001).

Ruan, B., Wilson, W.K., Pang, J., Gerst, N., Pinkerton, F.D., Tsai, J., Kelley, R.I., Whitby, F.G., Milewicz, D.M., Garbern, J.,and Schroepfer, G.J., Jr., Sterols in blood of normal and Smith-Lemli-Opitz subjects, J. Lipid Res. 42, 799-812.


 Major equipment available

 

EQUIPMENT IN THE LABORATORY

Biochemical

Centrifuge, Sorvall, model RC-5B

Centrifuge, Beckman, table-top

Sorvall OTD65B, ultracentrifuge

Beckman microultracentrifuge, TL-100

Eppendorf table top centrifuge, model 5415

Table-top centrifuges, low speed (3)

Tissue culture incubators (2)

Laminar flow tissue culture hoods (2)

Liquid nitrogen storage container (50 liters)

Sonifier, Branson model 450

-80 °C freezers (5)

Super Q Water System (Millipore)

 

Synthetic

Rotary evaporators (5)

Fraction collectors (15)

Ozonizer, Polymetrics model T-408

Neslabs Cryotrol CC100 immersion cooler (-100 °C)

 

Analytical

ZAB-HF high-resolution GC-MS

Quadrupole GC-MS systems, with VECTOR-TWO software (2)

GC instruments, flame-ionization detection (2)

HPLC systems with UV detection (5)

Chromatography data system connected to all GC and HPLC systems (ChromPerfect)

Beta-RAM radioactivity flow detector for 3H and 14C (IN/US)

Packard Model 1500 liquid scintillation counter

Shimadzu Model UV-1601 UV-visible spectrophotometer

Mattson Galaxy 6020 Fourier-transform infrared spectrophotometer

Jasco DIP-4 polarimeter

Glove box, Vacuum Atmospheres

Off-line NMR processing (NMR Suite 2.5 on a Silicon Graphics computer)

(The above list does not include a considerable amount of equipment contributed by Dr. Matsuda to the consolidated laboratory.)

 

DEPARTMENTAL EQUIPMENT

Avance 500 NMR spectrometer, including microprobes and a tritium probe

AMX-500 NMR spectrometer

Avance 400 NMR spectrometer

MAT-95 mass spectrometer with APCI and electrospray interfaces

MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer (to be installed)


Former students, postdoctoral researchers, and visiting scientists

Postdoctoral researchers, and visiting scientists

W. G. Niehaus

M. Tsuda

A. Christophe

A. Henry

R. White

J. St. Pyrek

A. Gara

J. Brabson

G. Emmons

J. Martin

U. F. Taylor

J. L. Vermilion

Y. Miura

D.L. Raulston

S. Nelson

T. Shimojo

L. R. Miller

R. Pelley

D. Chou

R. A. Pascal, Jr.

J. Herz

W. Spomer

T. Timmons

D.H. Needleman

R. Shaw

M. Hylarides

Y. Ni

J. Chan

S. Jungk

S. Numazawa

T. Akino

H. Hirata

S. Swaminathan

S. Trowbridge

K.-S. Wang

A. Siddiqui

Y. Akamatsu

K. Kudo

N. Gerst

F. F. Knapp, Jr.

R. Kuttan

A. Kisic

M. Wilson

E. W. Casserly

W. Wilson

D. Louie

R. Dam

F. D. Pinkerton

J. Ryan Thowsen

T. Stephens

J. Pang

K. Lund

A. Chu

X. Su

E. J. Parish

A. Izumi

S. Li

C. Brandon

H.-S. Kim

 

Graduate students of George J. Schroepfer, Jr.

A. M. Paliokas

T. E. Spike

L. Miller

W.-H. Lee Wu

B. Fourcans

C. Farris

A. Torkelson

H. M. Hsiung

G. Korbuly

C. Lee Duane

Y. C. Lu Lin

A. Izumi

P. Bender

R. Ostrow

T. Pajewski

R. Kammereck

Peter Chang

I. Yuen

R. Cochran

R. Kulmacz

D. Needleman

S. Huntoon

D. Raulston

N. Duhe-Kirkpatrick

C. B. Hirschberg

S. Fliesler

M. Arabi Nezhad

F. Albright

D. Monger

J. Carroll

D. Jackson

R. Pascal

B. Ruan

B. Lutsky

 

 

Undergraduate students of George J. Schroepfer, Jr. (partial list)

A. Blitz

Tom Pajewski

Michael Burkart

G. Bristol

V. Walker

Letitia Bridges

D. Rau

C. Anderson

Neelish Kenia

D. Bednarczyk

D. Frome

Josh Warren

C. Esmon

Nanda Duhe-Kirkpatrick

Ed Maa

M. O'Donoghue

M. Dishart

Chris Kwoh

J. Vermilion

N. Smith

Linda Kim

H. S. Emery

K. Strong

Greg Yerington

H. Gaskill

P. Chang

Shirley. Liu

N. Neff

K. Yazur

Joyce Ou

J. Osterhout

P. Nguyen

Sarah Ahmed

P. Chang

K.A. Stemke

Peter Lee

J. Garbern

Missy (Mary) Wheeler

Kevin Fox

R. Shapiro

Grace Pai

Peter Rogers

D. Raulston

Octavio Trejo

Justin Shey

H. Foyt

Karen Ruecker

Ray Sumpter

C. Mishaw

Terri Shieh

Julie Wilkerson

K. Cowin

Jacob Waugh

David Argüello

S. Satterfield

Melissa Ramser

Jennifer Rahmandar

C. Roberts

J. Geigerman

Christine Yeh

J. Deuchler

H. Choi

Elaine Lew

J. Chamberlain

J. Cho

Peggy Lai

A. Taylor

J. Kelso

Jonathon Wilks

Carlos Herrera

H. Nguyen

Tony Chiang

R. Diaz-Arrastia

J. Waldren

James Tsai

 

 

Rebecca Romero